Skip to main content

About your Search

20140426
20140504
STATION
CNNW 14
CSPAN 2
KNTV (NBC) 2
LINKTV 2
MSNBCW 2
CNBC 1
KCSM (PBS) 1
KPIX (CBS) 1
KQED (PBS) 1
KQEH (PBS) 1
LANGUAGE
English 37
French 1
Search Results 0 to 37 of about 38 (some duplicates have been removed)
and others. and in germany. >> family members are outraged. they were hurt that these support centers are closing in by a jenning but at some point, an airline has to say, we don't have any more information, right, we have to do this or is this timing particularly bad? >> well, the timing is particularly bad because there is still for the answers where their loved ones are. but in most air crash accidents, certainly all the ones i have worked on, the airline usually closes down its support system and they have a care team assigned member assigned to each family. they cut that off at about day 45 and that's pretty standard and the reason is, that is in most cases, the case is moving on to a different stage, here because they don't have a plane or their loved ones, it's particularly bad timing. it's not unusual to close it down about this point. >> oh, boy, thanks so much to both of you. appreciate it. >> already. the other woman in this clipper owners scandal is talking. what she told barra walters about her relationship with donald sterling and whether she thinks she a racist. first,
to be making much of a difference and now you've got the white house and you've got germany and other members of the european union who are threatening more sanctions. how might that really impact the situation there? >> well, sanctions need to do two things. one, they need to punish the russians for the actions that they've already taken in annexing crimea, illegally, totally unprovoked. the second thing they need to deter the russians from further action. the russians have already gone beyond crimea. they've already sent their special forces into eastern ukraine to stir up trouble, and that's the trouble you're seeing now in eastern ukraine. it is only in eastern ukraine where the russians sent in their special forces that there's any difficulty around that country, around ukraine. the rest of the country is calm. so the sanctions which should go into effect now, the elevated sanctions, the harsher sanctions are necessary now, not waiting for two more weeks. >> the u.s., president obama had been meeting and talking with angela merkel. germany has some leverage in all this, doesn't it? it se
the sanctions are are not known. >> germany rles on russia -- relies on russia for gas. >> energy flows conditioned during the height of the cold war. the idea that you turp off the tap -- turn off the tap on russian oil and gas exports, i think, is unreallistic. >> barack obama said sanctions could hit the armed sector, finance or lines of credit for trade. the two world leaders held their first meeting in three years, the ukraine crisis bringing them together in a way ta looked unlikely. germany's leaders are angry over n.s.a. eaves dropping on angela merkel's private phone calls. the chancellor saying there's room to cooperate. >> translation: there are differences of opinion over what balance to strike over surveillance to protect sit dispns and preinging the privacy -- citizens and protecting privacy. >> president obama was pawned to see the degree to -- pained to see the degree to which the edward snowden dislorms affected his relationship with germany. he tried to reassure. >> i have taken the unprecedented step of ordering our intelligence committees to take the rive si interest
germany is the biggest trading partner for russia, and german companies have been lobbying hard. maybe they want the sanctions early so they can get them over with early. here. the white house says the sanctions have already had a significant effect on russia's economy. true or not, michelle? >> you really have to look at it from two senses. for weeks the administration has been citing things like the weakening ruble, weakening russian stock markets. well, we talk to people who really know international markets and that was going on already. and also, it's really hard to separate out what problems would have been the results of russia's own actions in ukraine and what would be because of sanctions. but they have hurt, absolutely, the people and the entities targeted. for example, banks that are now essentially shut out of doing business in the dollar and the euro. >> all right. thank you very much, michelle kosinski reporting live from the white house tonight. >>> in the meantime tonight, malaysian officials say they may send a ship to investigate claims the missing plane may be in the
in putin. >> wolf, i think angela merkel, the chancellor of germany realizes that europe is not going to do anything and i think they have to respond, as you put it, to the putin challenge. i think military options are not off the table because they are week but because they are impossible to imagine. you're talking about going to the russia of border where russia spent 20 times what ukraine does on russia's budget. it's not clear what the ukrainian army is. remember, a large part of the ukrainian army in the east are ethnic russians. it's not entirely clear that they would side with the government. the sanctions route is the one that has to be tried and the german chancellor seems pretty firm that the europeans would join in broader sanctions and they want to keep ratcheting them up. it's important to know how much of an effect they have had because they have created so much uncertainty about russia that no one is investing. the stock market is down 13%. russia tried to borrow money on the international markets last week. they had to withdraw the offering because they couldn't borrow any m
, germany, brazil. who have used columbine as an inspiration. and it's all that publicity that columbine got. the columbine killers they decided they wanted to feel important. and they sought revenge. revenge against their classmates who bullied them. maybe against all of society. and it seems to me that is the motive in this case, as well. >> i know -- i know it's revenge, i know a lot of it is notoriety. how could one not know about columbine even if you were a kid when that happened? i've heard a lot of folks say we, the media, we the public shouldn't be uttering the suspects' names because that then, of course, raises them to a level and elevates them to a level we shouldn't be doing. but do you think that would take away, you know, and some of these other potential school shooters' minds. the troubled minds, the intent to kill? >> first of all, the reporters have a duty to tell the public. and also, the idea of making them into big shot celebrities, putting them on the cover of celebrity magazines. but keep in mind that the copycat factor is inspired by all of this attention. during the
. >>> other news, president obama and germany's leader facing some serious questions today on foreign policy flash points including the crisis in ukraine. the president just wrapped up a joint news conference with the german chancellor angela merkel. the u.s. is warning of tougher sanctions against russia over ukraine. the president saying the preference is a diplomatic solution but if that doesn't happen the next step is more sanctions. he says he understands the concerns of some european countries but he's confident the u.s. and the european union will stand together. >> the goal is not to punish russia. the goal is to give them an incentive to choose the better course. and that is to resolve these issues diplomatically. and i think we are united on that front. within europe, within the eu, i'm sure there has to be extensive consultations. you've got 28 countries and some are more vulnerable than others to potential russian retaliation. we have to take those into account. not every country is going to be in exactly the same place. what has been remarkable is the degree to which all countri
? >> stand by. jim, how much distance, daylight, is there between the u.s. and germany on the imp sigs of sanctions? >> clearly enough to keep the real sector sanctions. really the step that's going to make a difference and impose a real economic price on russia and we saw that difference in the last week when you had the obama administration seemingly teeing up harder sanctions than they were able to deliver when announced earlier this week. but two, the u.s. administration has made clear that they're holding those sanctions for the event that russian troops roll across the border into ukraine and they'll make the point we need that step, we need to impose some sort of price. the trouble is, that lays out the possibility for what's happening now, which is in effect, the stealth invasion. russian directed separatists taking over cities and towns causing disruption, shooting down helicopters. it's a real problem. >> the u.s. has made the point, administration officials make the point over and over again, the unity of the united states with the european union is what's all important here
, to the white house. germany is one of our strongest allies, and angela is one of my closest partners. with her indulgence, i want to start by making two brief comments. first, as president, my top priority is doing everything that we can to create more jobs and opportunity for hard-working families, for our economic strength is a source of strength in the world. this morning we learned that our business has created 273,000 new jobs last month. all told our businesses have now created 9.2 million new jobs over 50 consecutive months of job growth. the grit and determination of the american people are moving us forward, but we have to keep a relentless focus on job creation and creating more opportunities for working families. there's plenty more that congress should be doing, from raising the minimum wage to creating good construction jobs, rebuilding america. and i want to work with them wherever i can, but i keep acting on my own wherever i must to make sure every american who works hard has the chance to get ahead. second point, i also want to say on behalf of the american people that our tho
to the growth in a revolting out the videos on you after all germany as it did in kenya needs of these could be tying into crazy huge. thanks to mom still has no room to maneuver in germany and things keep going back and tries to do with the eurozone in and yes friends you know you from i just sent another big story this week's discovery race between general electric on one side and siemens. johnny to take over all story or at least to the energy business all the french engineering from there is an ongoing debate on foreign ownership for its release unleashed a debate on foreign ownership of major french companies puts us in economists think of what's going on and the students who will. i think you know when and if you're too close to increased turned on on europe and indeed it did the aggies at your own you can choose to be so the teachers to pay for his nineteen and sentenced him to talk to each other. it is redolent with students it was going on in history the french has decided that we did a few things which we work with don't use being a prime example. and in the nuclear deal between yo
and on this issue, of course, of ukraine. it is also important to note that germany has a lot of economic ties with russia, and the question is whether you put more economic pressure on that country and actually affect the economic relations between germany and russia. so, a lot to think about here especially since big german companies, volkswagen to name one, have a huge stake in russia. and the more pressure you put on, the harder it is for those companies to continue to do business very well and thrive, carol. >> joe johns reporting live from the white house this morning. thank you. >>> still to come in the "newsroom," tensions flare and ukraine's military mobilizes. we'll look at a new offensive that could push the country closer to widespread fighting. [announcer] play close-good and close. help keep teeth clean and breath fresh with beneful healthy smile food. with special crunchy kibbles and great taste, it's a happy way to a healthy smile. beneful healthy smile food and snacks. the average person will probably eat something or drink something that is acidic on a daily basis. those acid
for it to be viable. currently, there is no such airport in japan. in germany, lufthansa is betting heavily on two of the world's largest commercial aircraft. the latest model of the boeing 747, and the massive airbus a380. one of the company's executives explains why. >> we have to see the position of frankfurt and also our hub in munich, and maybe in zurich, vienna also in the lufthansa group system so we have a possibility to connect a lot of european cities from these huge hubs, which means if you compare this with tokyo, tokyo is not a hub like frankfurt when it comes to servicing so many neighborhood countries. >> reporter: the situation in japan means airlines there are counting on smaller and more maneuverable planes. >> translator: japanese airlines are doing well financially. for example, japan airlines has just posted a profit of $1.5 billion. as far as our earnings are concerned, japanese companies have adopted a sounder strategy than their overseas competitors. it does seem wiser to be shifting towards midsize aircraft. >> reporter: for the time being, jumbo jets and airbus a380s oper
russian president putin told germany's chancellor that ukraine should withdraw its military from the eastern and southern parts of the country. president obama will meet with german chancellor angela merkel later today. >>> alarming news about greenhouse gases on our planet. new tests show the level of caon dioxide in our atmosphere is now at its highest in human history. one scientist told the san francisco chronicle, it is time to stop building things with tail pipes and smokestacks. >>> here they are. horses and jockeys getting ready for this weekend's kentucky derby. an unpredictable field this year. almost anybody could win in the two-minute race. prerace coverage begins at noon eastern, 9:00 pacific on nbc sports network. don't miss race coverage beginning at 4:00 p.m. eastern, 1:00 pacific, here on nbc. >>> in health news, a problem that keeps millions of americans up all night. now the fda approved a new pacemaker like device to treat sleep apnea. it happens when throat and tongue muscles relax blocking airwaves. the implant keep the air ways open by zapping them with an
point ceases to be in the interests of the german government. germany gets a third of its oil and gas from russia and some of germany's best-known companies, volkswagen for one, have huge stakes in russia. so any type of sanction has a potential economic blowback and it's just a sign of how the west has a limited toolbox in dealing with the situation in ukraine, chris. >> all right, joe, thank you very much for the reporting. >>> let's bring in cnn military analyst james "spider" marks a retired major generally and former commanding general of the u.s. army intillgence center. general, thank you for joining us. let's leave the politics aside and deal with the urgency on the ground. what do you believe the situation is? who is ukraine fighting? what do you think the stakes are? >> fighting two elements really. you do have pro-russian separatists that are in east ukraine, but they're being supported directly, not only in terms of what i would call over-the-horizon support, weapons support, but also they have russian forces are on the ground instigating this and these are the folks we've
. both the u.s. and germany have tried to apply pressure on russia to try to de-escalate the crisis in ukraine, the u.s. taking the lead on sanctions, while chancellor merkel has tried to use her closer relationship with russian president vladimir putin to resolve the crisis, but it's not clear whether those closer ties are helping. in a phone conversation that the two leaders had on thursday, putin told merkel that he wants to see ukrainian troops pull out of the southeastern part of their own country. white house press secretary jay carney called that suggestion preposterous. now, the white house expects both leaders, both president obama and angela merkel, to talk about another round of sanctions against russia. that next round would likely be targeted at russia's economy, key sectors of the russian economy, such as its banking and energy sectors, but that would hurt the german economy as well. so, expect that question to come up at a news conference with president obama and chancellor merkel later today. also, one other big question to expect would be about those revelations tha
has put up for sale and includes other allergy medication such as claritin. reports say germany's buyer is closing in on a deal to buy the unit for about $14 billion. on wednesday, another possible bidder, said it was no longer in the running. they could announce the transaction in the next few days. shares in frankfurt at this hour, they're trading up, a bit over 1% at the moment. back to you. >> bertha, thanks for that. good to see you. >> you, too. >> thank you. >>> in earnings news, linkedin reported a net loss. excluding items, the professional social networking site beat analyst forecasts as revenue rose 46%. membership rose 7%, the same growth rate as the fourth quarter. linkedin is forecasting full-year revenue growth below analyst estimates. shares in linkedin today currently up, 4% in frankfurt. they were down heavily after hours in the united states. >>> kraft foods has reported higher first quarter profits helped by cost cuts and moves to manage prices for key ingredients. revenue fell which missed analysts forecasts. kraft will be raising prices for nearly half of i
into the attack on september 11, 2012, they knew at the command center in germany it was direct assault and not connected to a protest or a video. >> it was mayoral on in -- early on in the earning. >> before 3:15 in the morning. >> absolutely. we were -- absolutely. we -- i would have to say probably dismiss that notion by then, by working with other sources. >> and by 3:15, local time, in the morning, on september 12th , 2012, sean smith was already dead, ambassador stevens was missing, and two hours latary mortar attack would kill the former navy seals. level testified they already knew, based on intelligence, that an al qaeda-linked group was to blame. >> it was -- >> the testimony is consistent with the september 12th e-mail from 2012 from state department official beth jones, where she tells mrs. clinton's closest aides, she is in touch with the libyans and told them sharia was behind the attack, not gadhafi loyalists. this e-mail was entered into the record today at the hearing. >> what are democrats saying? >> this morning house minority leader nancy pelosi seemed to dismiss the
. in fact, the general, the brigadier general from the africa command, they were stationed in germany, italy or germany, didn't have a forward basing. they were hours and hours away. that's one of the takeaways. have we improved security at these consulates and embassies? have they met that obligation since? >> that's an ongoing question and something that the administration has conceded and their independent review conceded that security was totally lacking, was not -- was not up to it. again, the reality is, not only the question of whether this was an intelligence failure, whether on 9/11 of all days, the government was not appropriately prepared for the prospect of a terror attack. >> that is a seriously -- >> system a question that i think -- >> strong criticism. >> when this gets into the political arena, you go off in lots of different directions about who's tough on television, who's soft on 200terrorism. we can focus on areas of conflict that arise and get to the bottom of the conflicts. to me today the question is as you look at this e-mail, it is clearly an attempt by a foreign po
, people lived in east germany constantly looking over their shoulder, wondering, which one of their neighbors was reporting on them. which am radplace had a microph? there were there hidden cameras? and people fought to get out of that. people lived under incredibly stress for that. and now we don't have that imposed on us by the government, although the nsa, notwithstanding, but we are rushing toward that voluntarily and delightfully, and maybe it's time we step back and say, do we really want to live in this technological panopticon? let's forget about donald sterling. put ourselves there. how many times a day do you have a private conversation that you really don't want to have recorded and then rebroadcast? and the technological element of this is what makes it really scary. we've always lived in a world where you could be talking to a trusted confidante, and they might repeat what you said. but that is markedly different from having yourself recorded or videotaped everywhere. and we are giving it away voluntarily. and maybe it's time that we realize we're at the bottom
. abe is scheduled to arrive on tuesday in germany. he'll also visit britain, portugal, spain, france, belgium over ten days. abe plans to seek closer cooperation with other leaders of the group of seven nations, ahead of a summit in june. >> translator: with regard to the situation in ukraine, i want to frankly exchange ideas with other g-7 leaders on how we can work together to reach a peaceful resolution through dialogue. >> abe is also scheduled to deliver a speech at nato headquarters in brussels. he'll explain his policy of pro-active contribution to peace. the policy outlines possible changes to the interpretation of japan's constitution. those changes will allow the country to exercise the right to collective self-defense. that would enable japan to use armed force to defense allies under attack. up until now, such activity has been considered to exceed constitutional limits. abe will also speak at the headquarters of the organization for economic cooperation and development in paris. he's expected to emphasize his government's efforts to revive the japanese economy. >>> gover
audience for ge's ceo and a rival bid from germany's siemens. settles a remarkable three-day scramble. hans nichols is in berlin to break down oust him down -- break down alstom's choices. are they going to be open on friday? >> they will not be open until wednesday. they have until then to , oneerate over one bid formal offer. it comes down to one crucial question. here is the ceo of an american company. do you ask for permission from the french government first before putting out that big? jeff himmel had the conversations with alstom. his board has approved it. then the french government got wind of it. today, he has a meeting with french president for an swap along. -- francois hollande. did he oron there is, should he have contacted the french state before he started getting everything in line? what has happened in the meantime, siemens has put together a rival bid. this is an asset swap. siemens would take the energy unit from alstom and give them the train unit. they are prepared to make guarantees for no job cuts for at least three years. it would make france the leader of rail and
in kharkiv, germany is also condemning pro-russian militia. barnaby phillips has more from donetske in ukraine. >> the self appointed mayor, they are in no position to complain about what has happened to them. >> we are not prisoners of war. we are the guests of mayor ponomayork and treated as such. >> reporter: at least they were able to show their families they were alive and well. and later one observer from sweden was released on grounds of poor health. these men were also captured by pro-russian gunmen near slovyansk. this is how they looked after their interrogation. in the road into slovyansk, the ukrainian army. this is not a town under siege but the army is working on no more coming in. that's because the government in kyiv is very concerned at how russia will respond to any use of force by these men. in the next town, artemisk, a demonstration in favor of russia. it's a small crowd although they do seem to have some support on the sidelines. pro-russians, control the government building in donetske, they had an unexpected visitor one of russia's most wealthy men, now try
of germany from the dasm which was down 2%. and of course germany is most exposed immediately through the situation in ukraine. sanctions will perhaps hit russia. >> the energy more than anything else. >> as much as energy. germany exports an enormous of its good through russia. there's a close economic relationship. and if you start disrupting that then a major source for income for germany is being disrupted. so that's an issue. >> there's a close economic relationship. and if you start disrupting that then a major source for income for germany is but what really? s it really pay-back time as russia would like to put it because of what happened in the 90s and the collapse of the soviet union that we were allowed to go in and take over places of raugs russian strategic influence and was able to do that fairly in a cavalier way that now it's time that mr. putin says enough is enough? >> i worked in germany in that period of time. and was there in 1990 when german unification came about. and the soviet union collapsed. and nobody at that time would have imagined that nato would extend
-soviets and because stallen starved the ukranians and they never forgot. >> germany in 1941 occupied entire ukraine. they immediately enslaved large portions of the population with the help of ukraine it was the entire jewish population of ukraine and a lot of forced labor backed germany to help work in the war industry. after the war, ukraine, the second most populist soviet republic enjoyed an almost special status within the 15 republics of the u.s.s.r. >> the relationship between the russians and ukranians was much closer than any other nick group. >> nikita kruschev ceded crimea to ukraine. during the next on 40 years, people in the ukraine were represented in the soviet elite. and breshnev, who presided over the soviet union for two decades was actually born in ukraine. kimberly martin was a political science professor at columbia university and barnard college. >> if you go through who the personnel were in top-ranking positions in both of the politics of the communist party and also in terms of who were the the industrial leaders, who were the military leaders and who were the leaders in th
for the investigation. now to the crisis in ukraine. pro-russian supporters took over a television station. germany is condemning the parading of european observers kidnapped on friday. pro-russian militias released one, several others are in custody. russian militia captured three ukrainian special forces officers and they, too, were shown to the media. barnaby phillips has more from near donetsk in eastern ukraine. >> reporter: the european military observers were paraded before cameras by the self-ponded major -- appointed mayor of slovyansk, vechislav ponomaryov. they are in no position to complain about what happened to them. >> we are not prisoners of war, but the guests of mayor vechislav ponomaryov, and are treated as such. >> at least they were able to show their families they are alive and well. later, one observer from swedeb was released on the grounds of you will health. others have not been treated so kindly. these three men were captured by pro-russian government need slovyansk. ukrainian intelligence officers, and this is what they locked like after the interrogation. >> on the road
. if women worked the same as men in egypt, the country's gdp could grow by 34%. uae, 12%. germany and france, 4%. and even the united states could see 5% more growth. but let's be honest. women working has produced economic complications. a larger, competitive workforce has arguably kept wages from raising very much. the brookings institution says if you look at working age men, the real earnings of the median american male have decreased by 19% since 1970, for a variety of reasons. women working has also produced social complications regarding raising children. the hard harvard business review conducted a study of american women who had left work to have children. 93% of them wanted to return to work, but only 74% of them managed to do so and only 40% were able to return to full-time jobs. the transformation of women's lives has been one of the great changes in history. it will take time to get it right and put in place laws and practices that make it work. perhaps this will be one of the tasks that hillary clinton takes on if she gets that new job everyone is talking about in 2016. >>> up
the hearts of men. >> solar number is grown up. it's still got a long way to go. >> germany ranks number one for using the most solar energy, and the u.s. number four. >>> a waiter needs good coordinationing speed and buenos aires puts its waiters to the test. daniel schweimler reports on the art of waiting tables. >> reporter: efficiency, poise and grace are three of the virtuous required. they were all on display at the 10th annual race for waiters and waite reses in the heart of buenos aires. >> dante is a previous winner, with more than 30 years in the job, he knows what is required. >> translation: a good waiter must be friendly, respond rapidly and treat the customers as well as possible, always with a smile they are the main characteristics of a good waiter. >> he's worked at the bar in the legal district serving lawyers and judges for two decades, a profession he loves, because he numbers dealing with the public. an often mallined profession. some practice it with a certain alt of style -- amount of style and pan ash. nowhere is the art of waiting a table better preserved than here i
of the dignitaries from southern germany, which would be very catholic. you've also got parts of england, ireland, all of those countries. of course, latin america. the gentleman standing behind pope francis is archbishop gainsfind. he was the assistant to pope benedict as well and elevated to archbishop. now he's the assistant to pope francis, and so when you see pope francis at a public event, you'll see archbishop gainsfind. if you see pope benedict at an event, which i did in january, archbishop gainsfind is there. he's the go-between. once you know him, you know both popes. >> this ceremony got started at 10:00 local time and lasted two hours there. pope francis is going down and doing what he's doing, shaking every day people's hands. when he became pope, wearing the wooden cross. what sticks out to you in the ceremony today as you've been watching the last couple hours? >> what sticks out to me is how formal it is. pope francis is keeping this warm right now. i don't think we'll see him do any selfies today. i don't think that's part of the program. but i do think you'll see, what you won'
on that. i'm sure you feel the same way about germany and parts of europe as well. but maybe they could pay a little more. i don't think you undermine the arrangement we had. >> i was based in china as a journalist. china is an extremely disruptive rising power potentially. think of all the american companies who manufacture, who supply chains include a lot of manufacturing in china, but also here. these are all stitched into the global patchwork quilt of globalization. at which america is a master mind. very well globalization, whatever pat buchanan may think. the absence of war in america as the preeminent security, it's expensive in terms of what we spend on ships and planes. we don't want to see japan arming to the teeth under a conservative nationalist prime minister picking fights with the northeast. >> isn't it comforting to you that capitalism serves as a restraint? you understand his reasoning. can you appreciate that and can you echo that? >> look. i think the problem that we have here in the united states is we have a weak economy and weakened economy that we can look forward
's mexico. there's croatia. you see an american flag. of course, germany. holland, of course, scotland i'm being told. >> there are so many people in that square in italy, we're having trouble hearing him. we're going to come back to him during the 3:00 hour for more. msnbc will have full coverage of tomorrow's services beginning at 4:00 a.m. eastern time. >>> one school for special kids, another for regular ones. for many, that's the rub with charter schools. is it really as simple as that? we're going to take a look at that. first, though, it's being billed as nine acres of guns under one roof. close to 80,000 people are expected at this week's nra annual convention. how anti-gun activists are fighting back. this is msnbc. salesperson #1: so, again, throwing in the $1,000 fuel reward card is really what makes it like two deals in one. salesperson #2: actually, getting a great car with 42 highway miles per gallon makes it like two deals in one. salesperson #1: point is there's never been a better time to buy a jetta tdi clean diesel. avo: during the first ever volkswagen tdi clean diese
and i remember seeing him when i was a soldier serving in germany. and i stood in ankle-deep mud taking pictures of him for the newspaper for the eighth army infantry division, and i was astounded and enthralled with his deliverance. he was so, so much a man of the people. >> yeah. there was something remarkable about seeing pope john paul ii in person. and you could make the argument he was live and in person by more people around the world than any human being in history. his travels across the globe, he was someone who a lot of people came to see and flocked to see. and there was always this sort of gravitas about him. one of the times i got to see him was actually at the bee at occasion of pope john xxiii. and what was remarkable, there is something about john paul ii, and that something, i think, is what's being recognized tomorrow in both of these men. they're not being made saints because of their accomplishments as pope or because of the things they wrote or said. they're being cannonized, because the church recognizes what is already the case. that these were holy men, and that
you look at those other countries in terms of minimum wage and things like that, germany has no minimum wage. their unemployment is 8%. france has a big minimum wage and their youth unemployment is 20%. >> we have an experiment here in the united states because each state tries a different pattern. we see illinois and california raising taxes and we see wisconsin and texas lowering regulations and taxes. it's the latter two that are doing better than the former two. >> that's right. the example i think your citing is texas. a lot of the net new jobeen cre >> let's spell it out. one third of all new jobs created over the past ten years have been created in texas and they have been dramatically lowering regulations in texas. >> plus the legislature in the state meets every other year. that's a great idea. and also add to the list that steve rightfully put forgot. >> he cut taxes in half. he cut government spending in half and the economy, boom, grew 7% a year under calvin coolidge. tell me which hike creates a middle class job and the interesting statistic. >> easy for you to s
's one in germany. there's only two really that would be available. >> thank you so much for your time. appreciate that. >> all right. >>> a teenager was stabbed to death in the stairwell of her high school on prom day. the stunned student body and police. they all want to know why. all stations come over to mission a for a final go. this is for real this time. step seven point two one two. verify and lock. command is locked. five seconds. three, two, one. standing by for capture. the most innovative software on the planet... dragon is captured. is connecting today's leading companies to places beyond it. siemens. answers. >>> investigators in connecticut are trying to figure out the motive behind a deadly attack on a 16-year-old honors student. it happened yesterday at a school in milford. just about 20 miles away from newtown. police say a classmate slashed maren sanchez to death in a school stairwell. this is heartbreaking. what happened? >> she was a very popular girl. we're hearing a lot on social media from her friends and family. at about 7:00 a.m. this all unfolded in the stair
obama convened a conference call with the leaders of france germany, great britain and italy to discuss the next steps against russia at the situation in ukraine grows ever more chaotic. in the end, no new economic sanctions came but the united states may hit russia with targeted sanctions in the very near future. but mr. obama wants to wait for european unity before trying to strike a blow against key sectors of the russian economy. here in seoul, south korea, president park warned north korea could conduct another nuclear weapons test at any moment. president obama called the dictatorship's foreign professional irresponsible and provocative and the u.s. is leaning hard on north korea to give up its nuclear weapons program. for "cbs this morning saturday," major garrett, seoul, south korea. >>> pressure is building in ukraine this weekend as separatists are now holding a group of european military observers, and concerns are increasing about a possible invasion. as russian troops continue exercises along the border. more from holly williams in done
quickly. you see some of the european economies are very tied to guest problems. germany has a pipeline underneath the baltics to connect directly to russia. i think that is one of the reasons you will see germany they do getnt -- their money from -- 40% of their gas from russia. the u.s. and russian economy is not nearly as integrated. there is certainly a love for he that it can cause us and european allies a lot of .inancial distress host: are we developing the infrastructure -- guest: i believe there are five or six lng terminal points. only one of those in louisiana is currently under construction. we are a long ways out from making the u.s. export industry to where we can help our allies in europe. opened a have recently liquefied terminal. we are equal to get fish eager get ---- we are eager to a lot of them are buying gas from russians. all of these countries are coming to us and saying, look, we are interested in buying energy resources but the problem is we are at least 10 years out from being able to fulfill the requests. host: we are talking with hannah thoburn from the fore
european countries - primarily germany, who, in theory, are in charge of the delegation. there are four germans, a czech, a pol, a dane and a swede. as you heard earlier in my report, the self-proclaimed mayor of slovyansk, a town under the control of separatist gunmen say they were accompanied by a man called a spy. we know that the separatists in slovyansk in recent days have taken a number of hostages... (technical difficulties) . >> we seem to have lost barnaby phillips. we've had a few technical problems connecting to him. we have the gist, of the group of o.s.c.e. monitors, missing, abducted in slovyansk, in the eastern part of ukraine. more on that as soon as we get it. in the meantime other news. >>> the palestine leadership is meeting to discuss peace talks after israel said it was pulling out. the decision followed a unity deal between fatah and hamas. the palestine prime minister quit his job, and that makes way for the formation of a new unity government. under the agreement elections could be held as early as 2015. >>> now, the u.s. president barack obama says leaders on bo
the league vie -- after verdict >> versai will les, by allowing kreup reparations against germany, the country that succeeded in being the guarantor of the global system after the war, underwriting the world bank, the integration.obal if you look at its distressing fatigue with the world, most demonstrate bid a to support aternational organizations, disstressing difficulty in consensus political for trade agreements that integration, a failure indo what's self evidently the interest of american workers support the xm banks, see, to,there for you, a failure a concern and a desire to ramp back military spending in a our potential adversaries military spending is rapidly. a reluctance to become embroiled in foreign challenges because they are too hard. ultimately, whether we will judged by history to have won the piece after the cold war, as we did after the second world war is in more today than would have seemed likely five or 10 years ago. the conventional security challenges, the conventional economic integration challenges that i've talked about. it's also the challenge of and g
Search Results 0 to 37 of about 38 (some duplicates have been removed)